Change screen or desktop background

Tired of the screen background that came with your Mac?
Here’s how to change it:

Method #1:
1. Click on the Apple menu  (upper left corner of your screen) and choose “System Preferences”
2. When the System Preferences window opens, click once on the “Desktop & Screen Saver” icon.

3. In the next window, make sure the “Desktop” tab is selected. Select images from the list on the left.
(See Screenshot below)
- Several collections come with Mac OS X.
- You can also look for images in your iPhoto library.
4. Click a picture on the right that you want to use as your background and it will instantly update your background screen.
NOTE: To have the desktop picture change on a regular basis or at certain times, select the "Change picture" checkbox and choose a time from the pop-up menu. This may affect the performance of some applications, such as games, that use a lot of graphics.

Method #2:
1. Click once on the current screen background. You should now be in the “Finder”
- It will say “Finder” in the upper left corner, next to the Apple icon, if you’re in Finder
2. Press the Control key (or Right-Click), then choose “Change Desktop Background...” from the shortcut menu that pops up.
3. You will then be automatically moved to the Desktop & Screensaver section of your System Preferences and you can follow the instructions from step #3 above.
(See Screenshot below)

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Microsoft Office for iPhone

Office Mobile for Office 365 Subscribers, according to the app’s listing in the App Store. Catchy, no?
You can use the app to view and edit Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files. You can even create Word documents and Excel spreadsheets on your iPhone, though not PowerPoint presentations. Documents, spreadsheets, and presentations look on your phone like they do on your computer screen—though smaller, of course—thanks to the app’s support for charts, animations, SmartArt Graphics, and shapes. You’ll access those Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files from SkyDrive, SkyDrive Pro and Sharepoint.

Read the full article at
MacWorld's website.
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Guide to Mac OS X Lion Gestures - printable guide

The guys at MacMost made this great guide - Enjoy!

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Check Wireless Signal Strength using 10.7 Lion

Found this on www.osxdaily.com
Here's the link:
http://osxdaily.com/2011/12/28/check-wireless-signal-strength-optimize-wifi-networks-mac-os-x/


Wi-Fi Diagnostics is an incredibly useful utility to troubleshoot and optimize any wireless networkand the signal strength of computers that are connecting to it. This utility comes bundled in Mac OS X Lion and works with all wireless routers and not only the Apple branded ones, meaning you can improve the performance of just about any wifi network by using it and making some adjustments along the way. It’s easy to use and we’ll walk you through the process of getting the best wireless signal using the app, but first we have to uncover the tool itself.
The Wi-Fi Diagnostics app is buried within
Mac OS X 10.7, here’s how to access it:
  • From the OS X desktop, hit Command+Shift+G and enter the following path:
  • /System/Library/CoreServices/
  • Sort alphabetically and find “Wi-Fi Diagnostics”, if you plan to use the app even somewhat frequently it’s recommended to drag Wi-Fi Diagnostics into Launchpad for easy access
With Wi-Fi Diagnostics now in the easier to access Launchpad… wpen Wi-Fi Diagnostics.app and check the radiobox next to “Monitor wireless performance” then click on the “Continue” button.

Now is when the fun begins. The chart you see is a live wireless signal strength and noise meter,you want the yellow signal strength bar to be as high as possible. Pay attention to the green line of noise as well, you want that to be as low as possible in relation to the yellow line of signal strength.

If the signal strength is high and noise is low, you’re already good and you don’t need to change much. For most of us, signal will be lower than we want it to be, depending on where the wireless router is stored in relation to our computer gear.
Here are some tips to try out and to improve signal strength, keep an eye on the signal as you make adjustments:
  • Tweak the physical antennas on the wireless router and aim them in different directions
  • Move the wireless router away from walls, fireplaces, etc – even just a foot or two of space can make a big difference
  • Move the wifi router away from TV’s, microwaves, refrigerators, and other electronics that may interfere with signal
  • Relocate the Mac in relation to the router, this is obviously easiest with a MacBook Air or Pro
Once you have arrived at a reasonable compromise to how your hardware is physically configured and signal strength, enjoy your newly optmized wifi network.

Some important things to remember here: not all internet connections are capable of transferring data at optimum wireless speeds, so you may not notice much of a difference in internet connectivity speed if any at all with these adjustments. This basically means that a weaker wireless signal may be more than adequate to transfer data at your ISP’s maximum bandwidth. Regardless, you’ll want the noise level to be as low as possible, since large amounts of wifi network noise can result in lost packets, reduced speeds, quirky behavior, random wireless connection dropping, and a variety of other problems.
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Delete locked files using Terminal

If there are several locked files in the Trash, you can unlock them all at the same time at the command line. Follow these steps:

1. Open Terminal. It's located in /Applications/Utilities.
Type: chflags -R nouchg
Note: Type one space (not pictured) after nouchg in the line above, so that it ends in "nouchg ".
Do not press Return yet.


2. Double-click the Trash icon in the Dock to reveal the contents of the Trash. If necessary, arrange the Finder window so that a portion of the Terminal window is still visible.

3. Press the Command-A key combination to select all files in the Trash.

4. Drag the files from the Trash to the Terminal window.
Note: This automatically enters the pathname for each file. This eliminates the need to individually empty multiple Trash directories, particularly when multiple disks or volumes are present.

5. Press Return. No special text message will be shown indicating that the command was successful.

6. Empty the Trash.

If the Trash does not empty or if you see a message in Terminal that says "usage: chflags [-R [-H | -L | -P]] flags file..." you most likely did not type the text in step 2 as indicated or did not leave a space.
Repeat the steps if this happens.

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Use Terminal to delete locked files

If there are several locked files in the Trash, you can unlock them all at the same time at the command line. Follow these steps:

1. Open Terminal. It's located in /Applications/Utilities.
Type: chflags -R nouchg
Note: Type one space (not pictured) after nouchg in the line above, so that it ends in "nouchg ". Do not press Return yet.

2. Double-click the Trash icon in the Dock to reveal the contents of the Trash. If necessary, arrange the Finder window so that a portion of the Terminal window is still visible.

3. Press the Command-A key combination to select all files in the Trash.

4. Drag the files from the Trash to the Terminal window.
Note: This automatically enters the pathname for each file. This eliminates the need to individually empty multiple Trash directories, particularly when multiple disks or volumes are present.

5. Press Return. No special text message will be shown indicating that the command was successful.

6. Empty the Trash.

If the Trash does not empty or if you see a message in Terminal that says "usage: chflags [-R [-H | -L | -P]] flags file..."
You most likely did not type the text in step 2 as indicated or did not leave a space. Repeat the steps if this happens.
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Good way to use Terminal to delete locked files

If there are several locked files in the Trash, you can unlock them all at the same time at the command line. Follow these steps:

1. Open Terminal. It's located in /Applications/Utilities.
Type: chflags -R nouchg
Note: Type one space (not pictured) after nouchg in the line above, so that it ends in "nouchg ". Do not press Return yet.
 
2. Double-click the Trash icon in the Dock to reveal the contents of the Trash.
If necessary, arrange the Finder window so that a portion of the Terminal window is still visible.

3. Press the Command-A key combination to select all files in the Trash.

4. Drag the files from the Trash to the Terminal window.
Note: This automatically enters the pathname for each file. This eliminates the need to individually empty multiple Trash directories, particularly when multiple disks or volumes are present.

5. Press Return. No special text message will be shown indicating that the command was successful.

6. Empty the Trash.

Notes: If the Trash does not empty or if you see a message in Terminal that says:
"usage: chflags [-R [-H | -L | -P]] flags file..."
You most likely did not type the text in step 2 as indicated or did not leave a space.
Repeat the steps if this happens.
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Website article reader for Google Chrome

One feature of Safari that a lot of my clients seem to love is READER.
It will take an article, at say CNN, and remove all of the clutter of advertising and unnecessary pics and simply show you the article. It's great, and every time I show it to someone who didn't know about it previously, they alway "oooh" and get excited about being able to read an online article without be distracted.
Well, now Google Chrome can do the same thing using a free extension called CLEARLY.
The people over at Evernote are the makers of it, so of course it helps with web clippings.
It really does do a good job however of cleaning up the website you want to read.
Click here to get it!
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Wireless printing from iPhone or iPad
with "Non-AirPrint Ready" printers

NOTE: This gem comes from a fellow Mac IT site out of Pittsburg - CranstonIT.com and I just had to share it.

Simple printing. It’s what iPhone and iPad Touch users ask for time and time again. Sending documents back to a computer for printing is time consuming and inconvenient. So, how do you print directly from your mobile device?

With the release of iOS 4.2, Apple gave iPhone and iPad users a way to send their documents directly to any AirPrint enabled printer. That’s a nice practical solution if you happen to have a printer that’s AirPrint capable. But, most of us do not. What if your printer doesn’t have this unique technology? That’s where a clever little free utility called AirPrint Activator becomes your solution.

With one simple download, AirPrint Activator allows you to print to any printer, even those without the built-in AirPrint functionality.

Setup is easy. Just follow the instructions below and within minutes your printer will be ready for iPhone and iPad printing. If you run into installation problems, give us a call. We’d be happy to help you install AirPrint Activator through a remote support session.
Follow the steps below to set up printing from your mobile device.

Turn on Printer Sharing on your Mac

1) Select Menu Option, Apple Menu > System Preferences


2) Click "Show All" at the top of the System Preferences window


3) Click on Sharing


4) Click the checkbox next to printer sharing


5) Click on the checkbox next to the printer you want to print to from your iOS Device.


6) Close system preferences.


Setup Airprint Activator

1)
Download the appropriate version (Intel or PowerPC) of AirPrint Activator 2.0 for your Mac.

2) Drag the Airprint Activator program to your Applications folder


3) Double-click on Airprint Activator to launch the program

4) Click the toggle switch to turn on Airprint Activator


5) Close Airport Activator


 
Print from your iOS Device

1) Launch an application that you want to print from. (Note: Most but not all apps support printing). 

2) Tap the "Share Icon"


3) Tap the "Print Button"


4) Tap "Select Printer"


5) Tap the printer you want to print to

6) Tap the "Print" button

Important Note: In order for Airprint Activator to work your computer must be turned on and not sleeping. You can turn on Display sleep but if the computer itself is sleeping then you won't be able to print.
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I've been too busy, but... learning

I've been over booked the last few weeks and wasn't able to keep up on the useful little bits of info that pop up all the time, that I think others should be able to have as a reference.
Mostly I've been handing business clients and that doesn't make for such good blogging, because it doesn't deal with a single MacBook Pro issue, but more of an email - Outlook office wide issue.
What I wanted to share about that was the simple act of observation. I was dropped, with almost no info, into the middle of a very busy business. They are in the fashion business and everything is flying around and everything is a "must have now" issue. They were very pleasant, but that is just the nature of that business and the people who tend to work there.
So back to the point of this...
A few times, I had no idea what the problem could have been, because I didn't know what type of email servers they had, where they were located, or even what the local IP network address were!
Basically, I was like a lot of my clients, a bit lost and not sure what to do next.
So, I just started with one laptop, and starting learning what "it could see" as far as the network around me.
Then I started by writing down specific IP addresses for important devices (ie. shared printers, file servers).
Before I knew it I had a very handy map of their infrastructure, both physical and technical.
My point is, that with a little patience, some good documentation and just an inkling of knowledge much can be gained.
If you remove the fear and just observe calmly everything just starts to fall into place.
Once you have some things in place then you can start figuring out what is wrong or what "doesn't fit."
I think most IT people know this, but I wanted to share it with others, so they can help themselves in the future.
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